Airline alliances call for globally harmonised approach to Covid-19 | News

first_imgOlderAccor signs for three properties in Djibouti Government-imposed travel and entry restrictions continue to significantly impact global travel demand. Meanwhile, Covid-19 testing has emerged as an important part of an end-to-end solution to enable the safe restart of international travel by potentially reducing the reliance on the blunt instrument of blanket quarantines.  “We welcome the publication of the updated CART report which, among other things, calls for the serious consideration of screening and testing as a means for easing travel and border restrictions, and reviving the travel and tourism industry and the global economy,” said Star Alliance chief executive, Jeffrey Goh. – Advertisement – The three major global airline alliances have offered their full support to the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s (ICAO) second-phase council on aviation recovery task force (CART) report.SkyTeam, oneworld and Star Alliance urge governments to implement the report guidelines for passenger testing protocols, as well as the adoption of digital health pass technology, so air travel may safely resume. – Advertisement – “A robust protocol for testing will also provide further evidence to demonstrate that air travel is not a material cause for infections and will pave the way for a framework of trust to be established between countries.” On behalf of their 58 member airlines, representing over 60 per cent of world airline capacity and carrying over 1.87 billion passengers annually prior to the Covid-19 crisis, the three alliances are calling for a harmonised approach to testing that will form the foundation of a trust framework, as recommended by the ICAO guidelines.  SkyTeam chief executive, Kristin Colvile, said: “Testing regimes and trials of digital health passes have identified means to restoring confidence and reopening borders, complementing the layer upon layer of passenger safety measures already implemented by airlines and airports worldwide. – Advertisement – – Advertisement – “Aviation supports millions of jobs around the world and drives international commerce, trade and tourism. Urgent action is needed to adopt testing and technology to mitigate Covid-19 risks and safely and quickly revive international air travel.” The recent digital ‘health pass’ trials, such as Common Pass, are presenting a strong case for using digital technology to deliver harmonised standards in the validation and verification of accredited passenger health data.The alliances support technical solutions that provide a consistent, scalable and affordable way to declare passenger health data that is simple to implement as part of the customer journey, with processes-initiated pre-travel to reduce passenger inconvenience at airports.  oneworld chief executive, Rob Gurney, said: “With extensive travel restrictions creating much uncertainty for customers, testing can play a role in enabling the safe restart of travel. “Any solution used in declaring passenger health data should be consistent, scalable and cost effective – this will provide clarity and confidence to customers, airlines and other stakeholders as international travel resumes.” NewerCelebrity Cruises launches new inclusive pricing modellast_img read more

Dominant Pakistan secure T20 series

first_imgANOTHER below-par batting display from West Indies enabled Pakistan to open up an unassailable 2-0 lead in their three-match Twenty20 international series with a 16-run victory in Dubai.The World T20 champions were skittled for just 115 in Friday’s opening T20, Imad Wasim’s five-wicket haul setting Pakistan on their way to a comfortable triumph.Twenty-four hours later, Pakistan were invited to bat first and posted 160-4 as Khalid Latif (40), Shoaib Malik (37) and skipper Sarfraz Ahmed (46) made useful contributions.West Indies then slumped to 89-7 in reply and some late defiance from Sunil Narine (30 off 17 balls) provided little consolation as the tourists finished on 144-9, Sohail Tanvir returning outstanding figures of 3-13.Pakistan made a slow start themselves and had only four runs on the board when Sharjeel Khan (2) played on to Samuel Badree in the third over of the match.However, although Badree (1-24) and captain Carlos Brathwaite (1-24) kept things tight, Pakistan were able to post a healthy total.Latif provided initial momentum by dominating a 54-run stand with Babar Azam (19), who holed out to long-on from Brathwaite’s first delivery.Having been put down by Nicholas Pooran at deep backward square on 22, Latif was run out in the 12th over, but Sarfraz and Shoaib shared 69 in quick time prior to the latter falling to Dwayne Bravo (1-38) in the final over.West Indies soon found themselves in deep trouble on 19-3, Johnson Charles falling cheaply to Wasim before Tanvir struck in successive overs to remove Evin Lewis and Marlon Samuels.Only 45 runs were on the board at the halfway stage of the innings, by which point Bravo had also departed to Mohammad Nawaz.Andre Fletcher (29) and Kieron Pollard (18) briefly rallied, but their dismissals in the same Hasan Ali (3-49) over signalled the end of West Indies’ hopes.Five boundaries from Narine, including a six off Hasan, came too late in the day and the Windies’ top scorer was out to the final ball of the match. (Omnisport.com).PAKISTANSharjeel Khan b Badree 2Khalid Latif run out 40Babar Azam c Pollard b Brathwaite 19Shoaib Malik c Pollard b Bravo 37*+Sarfraz Ahmed not out 46Umar Akmal not out 1Extras (lb10, w5) 15TOTAL (4 wkts, 20 overs) 160Did not bat: Mohammad Nawaz, Imad Wasim, Wahab Riaz, Sohail Tanvir, Hasan Ali.Fall of wickets: 1-4 (Sharjeel Khan, 2.2 overs), 2-58 (Babar Azam, 8.1), 3-85 (Khalid Latif, 11.4), 4-154 (Shoaib Malik, 19.2)Bowling: Badree 4-0-24-1 (w1), Taylor 4-0-28-0 (w2), Narine 4-0-36-0 (w1), DJ Bravo 4-0-38-1 (w1), Brathwaite 4-0-24-1.WEST INDIESJ Charles c Umar Akmal b Imad Wasim 10E Lewis c Sharjeel Khan b Sohail Tanvir 3+A Fletcher b Hasan Ali 29M Samuels c wkp Sarfraz Ahmed b Sohail Tanvir 1DJ Bravo b Mohammad Nawaz 18K Pollard c wkp Sarfraz Ahmed b Hasan Ali 18*C Brathwaite c Umar Akmal b Hasan Ali 8N Pooran c Mohammad Nawaz b Sohail Tanvir 4S Narine c Umar Akmal b Wahab Riaz 30J Taylor not out 10Extras (w7, nb6) 13TOTAL (9 wkts, 20 overs) 144Did not bat: S Badree.Fall of wickets: 1-12 (Charles, 2.3 overs), 2-15 (Lewis, 3.4), 3-19 (Samuels, 5.3), 4-45 (Bravo, 10), 5-82 (Fletcher, 14.2), 6-83 (Pollard, 14.5), 7-89 (Pooran, 16), 8-119 (Brathwaite, 18.2), 9-144 (Narine, 20)Bowling: Imad Wasim 4-0-18-1, Sohail Tanvir 4-0-13-3 (w1), Mohammad Nawaz 3-0-19-1, Shoaib Malik 1-0-3-0, Hasan Ali 4-0-49-3 (w2), Wahab Riaz 4-0-42-1 (w4, nb2).last_img read more

Byron Scott ‘felt betrayed, lied to and deceived’ by Mitch Kupchak, Jim Buss

first_imgByron Scott and Luke Walton had an unexpected meeting a few months ago, crossing paths at a restaurant after one of the Lakers’ late-season games. After exchanging pleasantries, their conversation shifted to Walton’s first season as the Lakers’ head coach.• HEAR THE PODCAST: Byron Scott on rookies, rebuilding, and the Lakers’ road back to greatness“I told him he’s doing a good job and to keep it up,” Scott said of Walton, whose team finished 26-56 as the organization made its fourth consecutive trip to the NBA draft lottery. “He told me a little bit about his frustrations, which I understood. But I thought he did a good job under the circumstances. If they give him a couple of those pieces that I’m sure they will, he’ll be much better next year.”The Lakers’ brass has offered Walton unequivocal support. Everyone from controlling owner Jeanie Buss to president of basketball operations Magic Johnson and General Manager Rob Pelinka praises his performance and the culture he is creating. Hence, Scott stressed “this is not one of those books that is a feel-great book.” The book, co-authored by business executive and close friend Charlie Norris, blends success stories and failures from Scott’s 14-year playing career and head-coaching stints in New Jersey (2000-2004), New Orleans (2004-2009), Cleveland (2010-13) and the Lakers (2014-16). The book also offered insight on Norris’ various businesses.“We took risks and weren’t afraid to step out and try new things. When we failed at those things, we were able to forget about them,” Scott said. “You think about them and reflect on them. But you also have to have the mindset of moving on. You also have to learn from them.”Scott maintains he has moved on from his Lakers head-coaching stint. He spent the past year working on his book and appearing as an NBA analyst on ESPN’s “The Jump.” During that self-reflection, however, Scott said he has no regrets about how he handled his time as Lakers coach.“Given that opportunity again,” Scott said, “I wouldn’t change anything, especially my approach.”In other words, Scott does not want a mulligan for yanking starting spots away from lottery picks D’Angelo Russell and forward Julius Randle only 20 games into the 2015-16 season. The duo later reclaimed their positions shortly after the NBA All-Star break.“I would do the same thing. I still felt like the job was given to them,” Scott said. “I don’t have a problem with young guys growing, understanding and developing in that (starting) role, but I do have a problem when they don’t cherish it, when they don’t hold it to a higher standard, when they don’t come ready to work.”Scott also dismissed criticism from inside and outside the Lakers of his stern approach, which affected his relationships with Russell and Nick Young. Scott mused “this old-school stuff people keep talking about, if old school and hard work is winning, I guess I’m old school.” He also contended, “I relate with players extremely well.”“There’s not a player in this league I had that I can’t communicate with or had some good relationships with,” Scott said. “Are there players that played for me that can’t stand me and vice versa? Yeah. I’m sure there are. But most of the players that I coached, when I come into contact with them, it’s nothing but mutual respect.”Reaching the young playersDespite his strong convictions, Scott said he once asked Norris for advice on getting through to Russell, Randle and Jordan Clarkson. Norris suggested Scott ask them two questions.The first: “What is blocking them from being great?”The second: “How can I help you become great?”Scott liked how Randle answered those questions. Scott said Randle blamed himself and pleaded with him “to stay on me, push me and make me accountable for everything I do.” Though Walton never took away Randle’s starting spot last season, he also found himself prodding the forward.“I’m still a big fan of Julius Randle,” Scott said. “He is a terrific young man and is really mature for his age. I think he wants to be great.”Scott has different feelings about Russell. He said the then-rookie’s demotion was partly because he frequently arrived to the Lakers’ facility only minutes before practice started. So, Scott eventually required his young players to complete individual workouts 30 minutes before and after practice.Though Walton has given Russell positive reinforcement regarding his play and has seen him participate in offseason workouts, he often mentioned Russell’s ongoing process in establishing a routine. Despite Russell averaging 15.6 points, 4.8 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals during his second season, Johnson and Pelinka instructed him to focus on improving his consistency, conditioning and leadership.“I don’t know if his work ethic has gotten any better. Some of the people I’ve talked to in the organization said that it hasn’t,” Scott said of Russell. “I just wish him all the best. The maturity level will catch up to him sooner or later when he realizes it’s an honor and a privilege to be in the NBA and be in the position that he’s in. He has to take full advantage of it.”Scott believes Clarkson took full advantage of his time, morphing from a seldom-used rookie into a definitive starter in 2014-15. A fan of Clarkson’s work ethic, Scott did say he found him “pressing in trying to score more and do more” during his second season because of his pending free agency. The Lakers ultimately re-signed Clarkson to a four-year, $50 million deal last summer.“I wanted him to be himself. But I didn’t want him to go out there and try to make things happen,” Scott said of Clarkson. “When you do that and think a little selfishly, it can come back and bite you in the butt because you can play even worse. He understood where I was coming from. I want all these guys to do well on the court because obviously financially it helps them and their family. He’s one of the guys I have a lot of respect for.”Therefore, Scott downplayed any potential awkward feelings Randle, Clarkson and Tarik Black might have felt when Scott was seated with them earlier this offseason at a Los Angeles Urban League event where Johnson was being honored.“It wasn’t like it was uncomfortable whatsoever,” Scott said. “We all had a really good time. Nothing but mutual respect for those guys.”As for the futureAs former Lakers teammates, Scott and Johnson share a mutual respect. Johnson wrote the foreword to Scott’s book, and Scott predicts the Lakers will be “back to championship-caliber basketball” in three to four years partly because of Johnson’s new role.“Earvin is a guy who isn’t going to take a bunch of crap,” Scott said. “He is a guy who is going to tell it to guys like it is. If he wants you gone, he’s going to get rid of you. If he doesn’t think you’re worthy of wearing that purple and gold and made of the right stuff, which is about winning, then he will find somebody else who is.”Scott isn’t sure if he’ll ever coach again, but after a year of self-reflection, he believes he would fare better coaching in college instead of the NBA.“They give you more time and you have a little bit more security,” Scott said. “There are too many teams in the NBA where owners and general managers say one thing and then the next year do another. I just don’t like the disloyalty and the politics that are going on a lot in the NBA. If I coach again, the collegiate level would be the better fit for me.”Why?“I get a chance to meet some of these guys when they’re 17 and 18 years old and hopefully make an impact on them before they make it to the NBA,” Scott said. “We still have too many guys who played AAU ball who still don’t have a clue on how to play the game of basketball. They still don’t know how to run a three-man fast break. There’s so many little things. I think I can have a much better impact on that level than I can on the NBA level.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersScott remembers a far different environment when he was the head coach with a different front office. His teams went a combined 38-126 during the 2014-15 and 2015-16 seasons as he tried to juggle managing the final injury-plagued seasons of Kobe Bryant’s career while trying to develop a young roster. He was fired, replaced quickly by Walton, then a Golden State assistant coach.Scott said he “felt betrayed, lied to and deceived” by former Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak and former executive Jim Buss. Though he had only two guaranteed years on his four-year contract, Scott contends that Kupchak and Jim Buss previously promised him they would exercise the team option for his third year. Scott also believes the Lakers used him to manage Bryant during his final seasons and farewell tour before making the coach a scapegoat for the franchise’s struggles.“If I asked him to do certain things, Kobe would do it because of his respect for me,” said Scott, who mentored Bryant during his rookie season in 1996-97. “Basically, you just wanted me there to help you guys get through the next two years, so Kobe doesn’t go crazy on you guys. I would be the one that can handle it. They know me. I’m not going to back down. I’m not going to be intimidated by anybody.”Success and failuresScott considers his experience as Lakers coach a “hard lesson learned,” which he addressed in a new book titled, “Slam-Dunk Success: Leading from Every Position on Life’s Court.” The title is a nod to both his time with the 1980s “Showtime” Lakers, when he helped them win three NBA titles and his time as the coach who oversaw the franchise’s two worst seasons.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more