Deery Series returns to 34 Raceway for 500th event, Arnold Motor Supply Dirt Knights join Saturday show

first_imgDeery Brothers Summer Series top 20 point standings – 1. Andy Eckrich, Oxford, 412; 2. Joel Callahan, Dubuque, 395; 3. Matt Ryan, Davenport, 386; 4. Curt Martin, Independence, 372; 5. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, 368; 6. Joe Zrostlik, Long Grove, 357; 7. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown, 345; 8. Justin Kay, Wheatland, 314; 9. Dalton Simonsen, Fairfax, 301; 10. Andy Nezworski, Buffalo, 298; 11. Jeff Aikey, Cedar Falls, and Gary Webb, Blue Grass, both 267; 13. Brian Harris, Davenport, 243; 14. John Emerson, Waterloo, 227; 15. Chad Holladay, Muscatine, 203; 16. Tommy Elston, Keokuk, 196; 17. Tyler Bruening, Decorah, 187; 18. Terry Neal, Ely, and Eric Pollard, Peosta, both 163; 20. Nick Marolf, Moscow, 159. Spectator admission is $20 for adults, $18 for seniors, military and students, and free for kids 10 and under. Pit passes are $35. 34 Raceway also hosted the 300th Deery event, on Sept. 15-16 of 2006, and the 400th series event, on Sept. 2, 2012. Pit gates open at 4 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 5 p.m. Hot laps are at 6:30 p.m. with racing to follow.  The winner of Saturday’s Arnold Motor Supply Dirt Knights Tour feature for IMCA Modifieds, the first AMS event held at West Burlington, earns $1,541 along with a Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot berth. A top prize of $2,000 is at stake Saturday. Eight different drivers have won the nine events held so far this season; Andy Eckrich of Oxford remains the point leader while Darrel DeFrance of Marshalltown brings his perfect attendance streak of 499 consecutive events to town.  “It is hard to articulate what it means to have run 500 Deery Brothers Summer Series events spanning four different decades,” said Tour Director Kevin Yoder. “It is appropriate that 34 Raceway will host it, as some of the more significant milestones in series history have taken place in West Burlington. It promises to be a special night.” The 500th event in Deery Brothers Summer Series history will be held Sept. 21 at West Burlington. Touring IMCA Late Models have made 50 previous visits to 34 Raceway, including the first-ever series race on April 11, 1987.center_img WEST BURLINGTON, Iowa – A milestone 33 years in the making will be celebrated Saturday night at 34 Raceway. Five thousand dollars has been added to purses for IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods. Those features pay $1,441 and $1,041 to win, respectively.  Arnold Motor Supply Dirt Knights Tour top 20 point standings – 1. Richie Gustin, Gilman, 276; 2. Joel Rust, Grundy Center, 242; 3. Kelly Shryock, Fertile, 226; 4. Kyle Brown, Madrid, 207; 5. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 204; 6. Cody Laney, Torrance, Calif., 203; 7. Corey Dripps, Reinbeck, 182; 8. Brock Bauman, Eureka, Ill., 167; 9. Al Hejna, Clear Lake, 141; 10. Chris Abelson, Sioux City, 126; 11. Tim Ward, Harcourt, 125; 12. Ethan Dotson, Bakersfield, Calif., 122; 13. Cody Bauman, Eureka, Ill., 113; 14. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, 107; 15. Ryan Ruter, Clear Lake, 93; 16. Todd Shute, Norwalk, 92; 17. Travis Hatcher, Honey Creek, 88; 18. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb., 78; 19. Jeremy Mills, Britt, 77; 20. Josh Most, Red Oak, 73. More information is available by calling 319 752-3434 and at the 34raceway.com website. The Saturday race program will be broadcast by IMCA.TV. The rescheduled Gangbusters 41 special, held in honor of the late Jim Oliver Sr., grandfather of IMCA driver John Oliver Jr., shares the Saturday card with the Deery Series and AMS Dirt Knights.  Completing the program are Mach-1 Sport Compacts.last_img read more

Syracuse men’s soccer has passion for fruit snacks

first_img Published on October 3, 2016 at 11:53 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 Jukka Masalin is Syracuse’s fruit snacks culprit. Nestled somewhere in the associate head coach’s office lie a stash of hidden packets. They are beloved, weigh only a few ounces and fit easily into pockets.Yet they are off limits to players. Only on special occasions, namely road trips, does Masalin grant players their favorite treat. Syracuse loves fruit snacks. Coaches rely on the treats to get them through the afternoon drag. Players eat them between class, during road trips and before games. The Orange (8-1-1, 2-1-1 Atlantic Coast) will once again devour packages on its two-hour bus ride east to Albany, New York for Tuesday’s matchup against the Great Danes at 7 p.m. “On away trips, that’s always a fan favorite,” said senior midfielder Oyvind Alseth. “When a new pack is open, you have to be near the front of the line if you’re hoping to get some of that because they go quickly. A lot of my teammates are very, very fond of the fruit snacks.”For years, Masalin has trekked to local Wegmans stores, BJ’s Wholesale Club in East Syracuse and Costco Wholesale in Camillus to replenish his supply. He usually buys them in bulk because “these guys eat like horses,” he said. “I have to feed them all the time. That’s the problem.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe Orange goes through boxes of them. The team is “always” munching on fruit snacks — sometimes instead of studying. Manley Field House’s Grab N’ Go, a cafe for athletes, offers a variety of snacks, but there are no fruit snacks there. Players must either buy their own or sneak into Masalin’s office.“We’re not supposed to know where they are,” forward Sergio Camargo said. “Even though I’m a transfer, I’m a senior and closer to the other seniors, so we know the inside and outs. Every once in awhile I go in there and steal some.”Since the packages are light, players bring bags on their carry-ons at the airport, passing through security just fine.The snacks are not for everyone. Camargo is a fan, but notes he’s “more of a fruit and nut kind of guy,” so he limits his fruit snack consumption. Sophomore goalkeeper Hendrik Hilpert abstains altogether. “I have to watch my weight,” Hilpert said. “The other players can have a little more fun with that stuff.”They go through several boxes every couple of weeks and hoard them in their rooms. Senior forward Chris Nanco, who already has four goals, always has a few packets in his backpack because he never knows when he might need to nibble. Even his head coach has taken part.“I’ve indulged like my 9-year-old daughter,” Syracuse head coach Ian McIntyre said. “There’s a little bit of sugar in there, so it’s not ideal. But I can indulge.”They have 11 grams of sugar per mini package. Fruit snacks were originally intended for backpackers because they are a lightweight, convenient, high-energy food, according to Welch’s website. They also can enhance soccer players’ energy levels, said Jane Burrell Uzcategui, an instructor of nutrition in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics.The snacks, which contain 80 calories and 20 grams of carbohydrates, usually are a wise choice for players, she said. “Soccer is the kind of sport where having a carbohydrate-rich diet helps athletes restore and play at higher intensity,” Uzcategui said. “They’re a good choice for a little pick-me-up. But if they’re not playing the whole game, they don’t need them. It’s for the ones playing all of the game, the ones needing more calories.”Their effect is like that of Gatorade, Uzcategui said. The snacks work especially well for athletes who grow anxious before games and have difficulty eating. During games, Uzcategui emphasized athletes should strive for 30-50 grams of carbs every hour. Three packets an hour will suffice, but Uzcategui said nothing should replace water consumption. One of the snack’s notable pitfalls is its stickiness. It’s “not good” for sugar to sit on teeth, Uzcategui said, as high consumption can lead to cavities. But the snacks are convenient and easy to digest — enough of a draw for SU. “Look, we’ve got a volunteer assistant and a graduate assistant,” McIntyre said. “These guys don’t eat much, so we use fruit snacks to get them through the day.“It may not be a guilty pleasure, but it is a pleasure we enjoy.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more