Cap & Reg gets in line for Miller’s £75m Swansea Morfa project

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Byron Scott ‘felt betrayed, lied to and deceived’ by Mitch Kupchak, Jim Buss

first_imgByron Scott and Luke Walton had an unexpected meeting a few months ago, crossing paths at a restaurant after one of the Lakers’ late-season games. After exchanging pleasantries, their conversation shifted to Walton’s first season as the Lakers’ head coach.• HEAR THE PODCAST: Byron Scott on rookies, rebuilding, and the Lakers’ road back to greatness“I told him he’s doing a good job and to keep it up,” Scott said of Walton, whose team finished 26-56 as the organization made its fourth consecutive trip to the NBA draft lottery. “He told me a little bit about his frustrations, which I understood. But I thought he did a good job under the circumstances. If they give him a couple of those pieces that I’m sure they will, he’ll be much better next year.”The Lakers’ brass has offered Walton unequivocal support. Everyone from controlling owner Jeanie Buss to president of basketball operations Magic Johnson and General Manager Rob Pelinka praises his performance and the culture he is creating. Hence, Scott stressed “this is not one of those books that is a feel-great book.” The book, co-authored by business executive and close friend Charlie Norris, blends success stories and failures from Scott’s 14-year playing career and head-coaching stints in New Jersey (2000-2004), New Orleans (2004-2009), Cleveland (2010-13) and the Lakers (2014-16). The book also offered insight on Norris’ various businesses.“We took risks and weren’t afraid to step out and try new things. When we failed at those things, we were able to forget about them,” Scott said. “You think about them and reflect on them. But you also have to have the mindset of moving on. You also have to learn from them.”Scott maintains he has moved on from his Lakers head-coaching stint. He spent the past year working on his book and appearing as an NBA analyst on ESPN’s “The Jump.” During that self-reflection, however, Scott said he has no regrets about how he handled his time as Lakers coach.“Given that opportunity again,” Scott said, “I wouldn’t change anything, especially my approach.”In other words, Scott does not want a mulligan for yanking starting spots away from lottery picks D’Angelo Russell and forward Julius Randle only 20 games into the 2015-16 season. The duo later reclaimed their positions shortly after the NBA All-Star break.“I would do the same thing. I still felt like the job was given to them,” Scott said. “I don’t have a problem with young guys growing, understanding and developing in that (starting) role, but I do have a problem when they don’t cherish it, when they don’t hold it to a higher standard, when they don’t come ready to work.”Scott also dismissed criticism from inside and outside the Lakers of his stern approach, which affected his relationships with Russell and Nick Young. Scott mused “this old-school stuff people keep talking about, if old school and hard work is winning, I guess I’m old school.” He also contended, “I relate with players extremely well.”“There’s not a player in this league I had that I can’t communicate with or had some good relationships with,” Scott said. “Are there players that played for me that can’t stand me and vice versa? Yeah. I’m sure there are. But most of the players that I coached, when I come into contact with them, it’s nothing but mutual respect.”Reaching the young playersDespite his strong convictions, Scott said he once asked Norris for advice on getting through to Russell, Randle and Jordan Clarkson. Norris suggested Scott ask them two questions.The first: “What is blocking them from being great?”The second: “How can I help you become great?”Scott liked how Randle answered those questions. Scott said Randle blamed himself and pleaded with him “to stay on me, push me and make me accountable for everything I do.” Though Walton never took away Randle’s starting spot last season, he also found himself prodding the forward.“I’m still a big fan of Julius Randle,” Scott said. “He is a terrific young man and is really mature for his age. I think he wants to be great.”Scott has different feelings about Russell. He said the then-rookie’s demotion was partly because he frequently arrived to the Lakers’ facility only minutes before practice started. So, Scott eventually required his young players to complete individual workouts 30 minutes before and after practice.Though Walton has given Russell positive reinforcement regarding his play and has seen him participate in offseason workouts, he often mentioned Russell’s ongoing process in establishing a routine. Despite Russell averaging 15.6 points, 4.8 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals during his second season, Johnson and Pelinka instructed him to focus on improving his consistency, conditioning and leadership.“I don’t know if his work ethic has gotten any better. Some of the people I’ve talked to in the organization said that it hasn’t,” Scott said of Russell. “I just wish him all the best. The maturity level will catch up to him sooner or later when he realizes it’s an honor and a privilege to be in the NBA and be in the position that he’s in. He has to take full advantage of it.”Scott believes Clarkson took full advantage of his time, morphing from a seldom-used rookie into a definitive starter in 2014-15. A fan of Clarkson’s work ethic, Scott did say he found him “pressing in trying to score more and do more” during his second season because of his pending free agency. The Lakers ultimately re-signed Clarkson to a four-year, $50 million deal last summer.“I wanted him to be himself. But I didn’t want him to go out there and try to make things happen,” Scott said of Clarkson. “When you do that and think a little selfishly, it can come back and bite you in the butt because you can play even worse. He understood where I was coming from. I want all these guys to do well on the court because obviously financially it helps them and their family. He’s one of the guys I have a lot of respect for.”Therefore, Scott downplayed any potential awkward feelings Randle, Clarkson and Tarik Black might have felt when Scott was seated with them earlier this offseason at a Los Angeles Urban League event where Johnson was being honored.“It wasn’t like it was uncomfortable whatsoever,” Scott said. “We all had a really good time. Nothing but mutual respect for those guys.”As for the futureAs former Lakers teammates, Scott and Johnson share a mutual respect. Johnson wrote the foreword to Scott’s book, and Scott predicts the Lakers will be “back to championship-caliber basketball” in three to four years partly because of Johnson’s new role.“Earvin is a guy who isn’t going to take a bunch of crap,” Scott said. “He is a guy who is going to tell it to guys like it is. If he wants you gone, he’s going to get rid of you. If he doesn’t think you’re worthy of wearing that purple and gold and made of the right stuff, which is about winning, then he will find somebody else who is.”Scott isn’t sure if he’ll ever coach again, but after a year of self-reflection, he believes he would fare better coaching in college instead of the NBA.“They give you more time and you have a little bit more security,” Scott said. “There are too many teams in the NBA where owners and general managers say one thing and then the next year do another. I just don’t like the disloyalty and the politics that are going on a lot in the NBA. If I coach again, the collegiate level would be the better fit for me.”Why?“I get a chance to meet some of these guys when they’re 17 and 18 years old and hopefully make an impact on them before they make it to the NBA,” Scott said. “We still have too many guys who played AAU ball who still don’t have a clue on how to play the game of basketball. They still don’t know how to run a three-man fast break. There’s so many little things. I think I can have a much better impact on that level than I can on the NBA level.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersScott remembers a far different environment when he was the head coach with a different front office. His teams went a combined 38-126 during the 2014-15 and 2015-16 seasons as he tried to juggle managing the final injury-plagued seasons of Kobe Bryant’s career while trying to develop a young roster. He was fired, replaced quickly by Walton, then a Golden State assistant coach.Scott said he “felt betrayed, lied to and deceived” by former Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak and former executive Jim Buss. Though he had only two guaranteed years on his four-year contract, Scott contends that Kupchak and Jim Buss previously promised him they would exercise the team option for his third year. Scott also believes the Lakers used him to manage Bryant during his final seasons and farewell tour before making the coach a scapegoat for the franchise’s struggles.“If I asked him to do certain things, Kobe would do it because of his respect for me,” said Scott, who mentored Bryant during his rookie season in 1996-97. “Basically, you just wanted me there to help you guys get through the next two years, so Kobe doesn’t go crazy on you guys. I would be the one that can handle it. They know me. I’m not going to back down. I’m not going to be intimidated by anybody.”Success and failuresScott considers his experience as Lakers coach a “hard lesson learned,” which he addressed in a new book titled, “Slam-Dunk Success: Leading from Every Position on Life’s Court.” The title is a nod to both his time with the 1980s “Showtime” Lakers, when he helped them win three NBA titles and his time as the coach who oversaw the franchise’s two worst seasons.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Susan G. Komen Florida Names 2020 Warriors In Pink

first_imgTanya Burke, age 52, West Palm BeachTanya is a two-year survivor.  She found her breast cancer early thanks to a self-exam that detected a lump that was later diagnosed as Stage 1A triple negative breast cancer. As a single African American woman, she wants to set an example of looking within for inspiration and helping more women of color become visible in the fight. Denise Kaslow, age 57, Palm Beach GardensDenise is a 20-year survivor.  She has been involved with the Race for Cure for the past 21 years, serving as a Race team captain and repeatedly recognized as a top ten individual fundraiser.  She has also participated in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day Walk four times in cities across the U.S. She hopes that her support of Komen will be an inspiration to others so that one day there will be a world without breast cancer. Betsy Burden, age 59, Palm Beach GardensBetsy is a 13-year survivor.  As one of the founding members of the Christ Fellowship Cancer Support Group, Betsy comforts other cancer patients, and as the president of the Lighthouse Dragons Breast Cancer Survivor Dragon Boat Team, she offers survivors and their supporters the many benefits of healthy exercise and sisterhood camaraderie. Sabine Millien-Felix, age 58, West Palm BeachSabine is a survivor of less than one year.  She has vowed to assist other women going through breast cancer personally by reaching out to those paralyzed with fear who don’t know what to do—especially those in her Haitian community—as well as professionally by lending her guidance for working with insurance companies to get much needed treatments. Kim Brisky, age 57, Hobe SoundKim is a one-year+ survivor.  She was diagnosed on April Fool’s Day 2018.  The timing may have foreshadowed one of the important things Kim leaned on to get her through her journey: a sense of humor.  She hopes to pay forward the love and support she has been given by her family and co-workers by helping other patients through their journeys. Susan G. Komen Florida announced their 2020 Warriors in Pink on October 15, 2019 at the organization’s “Pink Flamingo Party” at the Palm Beach Zoo.  The festive atmosphere reflected the spirit of the nine chosen survivors and their passion for defeating breast cancer as ambassadors for Komen and the 2020 South Florida Race for the Cure on January 25, 2020 in Downtown West Palm Beach.The 2020 Warriors in Pink demonstrate the disease can strike anyone, regardless of family history, age, ethnicity, race or gender.  They will carry their message of breast cancer awareness to their own communities and take action collectively to create a groundswell of support in South Florida to help Komen reach its Bold Goal to reduce U.S. breast cancer deaths by 50% by 2026. The 2020 Komen Florida Warriors in Pink are:Kay Alvarez, age 43, West Palm BeachKay is a one-year survivor. Despite undergoing seven surgeries, Kay remained filled with determination, perseverance and persistence due to her family. Kay is determined to do her absolute best to raise awareness about early detection because that is what saved her.center_img About Susan G. Komen®Susan G. Komen® is the world’s leading nonprofit breast cancer organization, working to save lives and end breast cancer forever. Komen has an unmatched, comprehensive 360-degree approach to fighting this disease across all fronts and supporting millions of people in the U.S. and in countries worldwide.  We advocate for patients, drive research breakthroughs, improve access to high-quality care, offer direct patient support and empower people with trustworthy information.  Born out of a promise between two sisters, Susan G. Komen remains committed to supporting those affected by breast cancer today, while tirelessly searching for tomorrow’s cures. Brie Pestano, age 34, Boynton BeachBrie is a two-year breast cancer survivor.  She wants to help other young breast cancer patients stay strong mentally as much as possible, believing a positive attitude is essential to overcoming the battle.  Brie is also determined to find a way to help create a network where women can share information that may help physicians and scientists determine the cause for the disease.The 2020 Warriors in Pink will share their experiences with the community throughout the year and have a special role at the Komen South Florida Race for the Cure on January 25th in Downtown West Palm Beach.  They will lead hundreds of survivors to the Meyer Amphitheatre stage during the Survivor Recognition Ceremony, where all will be recognized for their fight against breast cancer.  Following the ceremony, the Warriors will lead all survivors on the 5K walk along Flagler Drive.  They will follow a Ford pace car, the national supporter of the Warriors in Pink program devoted to recognizing women who live by the credo of taking charge, living out loud, harnessing power and standing together.“Our Warriors are an inspiration to all that we will not let breast cancer defeat us,” said Kate Watt, executive director of Komen Florida.  “They are helping us take the fight to every corner of our community to drive awareness and save lives because they know if it can happen to them, it can happen to anyone.”To learn more about the Race for the Cure and Warriors in Pink, visit https://komenflorida.org/2020-warriors-in-pink/.About Susan G. Komen® and Komen Florida: Komen Florida is helping fuel research, advocate for patients and support people facing breast cancer locally through a variety of direct patient-centered services and by collaborating with area providers to remove barriers and connect people to needed care across the state of Florida. For more information, call (561) 514-3020 or visit www.komenflorida.org. James Keegan, age 71, Palm CityJames is a six-year breast cancer survivor.  His mission is to raise awareness that men can also get breast cancer, encourage them to examine themselves and ask their physicians to examine their breasts during their annual physicals, and take action at the first sign of an issue. Heidi Kirk Garcia, age 50, JupiterHeidi is a four-year survivor.  She believes that early detection saved her life and stresses the importance of annual mammograms.  Heidi shares that breast cancer is a “family” diagnosis, crediting her loved ones for getting her through treatment, and also recognizes her fellow employees at NextEra Energy/FPL who share their breast cancer experiences and support each other daily.last_img read more

Price burns up Pattavia with hot score

first_imgLadies winner was Pai Vos (29) with a creditable 41 points, while Wiyada Stafford (28) had 40 points to go with her technical on hole #2.Low Gross winner was Peter Park (5) with 76 to go with his technical on hole #1, while further honourable mentions go out to Ken Price with his 2 long drives and his approach on hole #10.  Unlucky countback loser Sami did get some consolation with a technical prize on #8.Next month’s final event of the year is at Greenwood on 17 December. Ken Price (right) receives his prize golf bag.Another day dawned and golfers descended on the Pattavia course for the November Pattaya Amateur Golf Society (PAGS) tournament on Wednesday, 28th.  The day’s field of 105 players which included an improved contingent of 16 ladies had to contend with a course seeming to play hard and fast, with a light breeze to add some interest to approach shots.Ken Price (H/cap 15) shot the best round of the day, winning the B Flight for handicaps 14–22, with an outstanding 45 points. Mind you, Ken needed to shoot this score as Glenn Armistead (18), who has averaged 40+ points over his past 3 PAGS rounds, signed for 43 points, while Bill Kana (22) picked up third spot with 41.A Flight for handicaps 0–13 was won by Juha Harilo (13) with a solid 41 points, while the minor places required countbacks with 3 players on 40 points.  Daniel Isaramat (12) led the way with a back nine of 21, while Mike Gerri (10) edged the unlucky Sami Torkkeli for the bronze 19/18.In the C flight, for handicaps 23+, there were countbacks required to settle the winners with Mike Warner (34) with a comparatively paltry 39 points getting the better of Odd Hansen (29) 18/17 on the back nine.  Gabriel Enright was the successful countback winner for third spot, beating James Sulavori 18/15 after both players signed for 38 points.last_img read more