ABS Introduces Advisory for Subsea Processing Systems

first_imgABS has issued the ‘ABS Subsea Processing System Advisory’ to help industry evaluate subsea processing systems, providing an overview of the available technologies, maturity levels, challenges and future trends.“Subsea processing systems are increasingly considered as a cost-effective solution for both brownfield and greenfield developments. As the industry adopts subsea boosting and other enabling subsea processing technologies, it is important to review and understand where we are with respect to these technologies,” said ABS executive vice president, Ken Richardson.“The advisory helps review the key aspects and outlines the steps involved in developing a subsea processing system for a project. While subsea processing systems are expected to deliver high levels of operational reliability, leveraging established classification organizations’ verification and validation processes will play a critical role in providing confidence in these technologies and their integration with the overall subsea production system.”The benefits of a subsea processing system include the potential for reducing CAPEX and OPEX associated with topside facilities, increased design flexibility, improved recovery and production rates, extended field life, reduction of flow assurance problems, debottlenecking of topside water treatment constraints and reduction of energy consumption for produced water.last_img read more

Call for global crackdown on fake medicines

first_img 16 Views   no discussions Share HealthLifestyle Call for global crackdown on fake medicines by: – November 14, 2012 Sharing is caring! Tweetcenter_img Share Share Counterfeit drugs may contain harmful ingredients or no active ingredient at allA global treaty to crack down on the deadly trade of fake medicines is urgently needed, say experts.Currently, there are more sanctions around the use of illegal tobacco than counterfeit drugs. Writing in the British Medical Journal, experts urge the World Health Organization to set up a framework akin to its one tobacco control to safeguard the public. WHO says more than one in every 10 drug products in poorer nations are fake.A third of malaria drugs are counterfeit, research suggests. In richer countries, medicine safety is better, but substandard and falsified drugs still cause thousands of adverse reactions and some deaths. Recently, in the US, contaminated drug supplies caused an outbreak of meningitis that has so far killed 16 people.Global problemAmir Attaran and colleagues from the World Federation of Public Health Associations, International Pharmaceutical Federation and the International Council of Nurses, say while governments and drug companies alike deplore unsafe medicines, it is difficult to achieve agreement on action because discussions too often trespass into conflict-prone areas such as pharmaceutical pricing or intellectual property rights.Although some countries prohibit fake medicines under national law, there is no global treaty which means organised criminals can continue to trade using haven countries where laws are lax or absent. WHO estimates nearly a third of countries have little or no medicine regulation.In other contexts, global treaties have helped governments strengthen their laws and cooperate internationally to clamp down on havens – for example, on money laundering. Similarly, a new protocol under the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control requires tobacco products to be tracked and criminalises illicit trade globally – “oddly making the law tougher on cigarette falsification than on medicine falsification”, says Amir Attaran. “The protocol will now make it a requirement to track and trace tobacco products. Cigarette packets can carry serial numbers so it is possible to track them from beginning to end.“If this is something you can do for a $5 cigarette packet I do not see why we can’t do it for a $3,000 packet of drugs that could save your life.“In Canada we have seen a fake version of the heart drug Avastin come into the country that contains no active drug, just starch and nail polish remover. “When you are dealing with a medicine like that if there was a serial number on it you would be able to easily see if it was fake.”WHO says it provides direct country and regional support for strengthening medicines regulation.And it is up to its 194 member states to decide if a treaty is the way forward. In 2011, a directive to protect patients from fake medicines was approved by the European Parliament.By Michelle RobertsHealth editor, BBC News onlinelast_img read more

Team Nigeria Departs for Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast

first_imgThe second batch of nine athletes and four coaches will leave this week as soon as their visas are issued while the wrestling team comprising 12 wrestlers and four coaches will depart on April 2, 2018.The XXI Commonwealth Games is scheduled to start on April 4 and run through April 15,  2018 in Gold Coast, Australia with 71 commonwealth countries taking part in the Games. Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Team Nigeria’s first batch of 70 athletes and coaches for the XXI Commonwealth Games left Abuja at about 6pm on Saturday aboard Emirates Airline for the Gold Coast, Australia as the Games Village formally opened for business yesterday.46 athletes in athletics, para-athletics, table tennis, para – table tennis, basketball, gymnastics, para powerlifting, weightlifting, boxing and 17 coaches, loaders and helpers as well as seven medical personnel made the trip to the Games.The athletes were in high spirit at the time of departure as all allowances were paid to them. Each athlete received N15,000 per day for 21 days being the period of the last phase of camping. They were also given specific competition kit and equipment.last_img read more

Fake caterpillars reveal the worst places in the world to be prey

first_img By Elizabeth PennisiMay. 18, 2017 , 2:00 PM Fake caterpillars reveal the worst places in the world to be prey Living in the tropics or at low elevations is much more dangerous than living in cooler climates. That’s the conclusion of a new study with an unusual methodology: deploying bright green clay caterpillars around the world. Biologists already know that the numbers of kinds of plant and animals decreases with distance from the equator. And they suspected there might be similar trends in how species interact, but no one had studied this systematically in different places. So researchers made 2900 dummy caterpillars (pictured) that 40 colleagues placed at 31 sites at different latitudes and elevations and then retrieved 4 to 18 days later. Back in the lab, the ecologists counted up the attacks by different predators—they can tell the nick of a bird’s beak from the teeth marks of a mouse or the paired piercings of ant, for example. Daily attack rates dropped 2.7% for every degree of latitude—or every 111 kilometers—north or south from the equator. As such, at the farthest spot—in the Arctic—predation was 1/8 that at the equator, the team reports today in Science. The difference was mostly in the number of attacks by arthropods, mostly ants, in the tropics. The rates also dropped 6.6% for every 100-meter increase in elevation. Though it’s not yet clear whether these trends hold for all plant eaters, that they exist at all means that ecologists need to keep them in mind as they figure out the dynamics of how ecosystems function.last_img read more