Puricelli: The Administration Is Committed to the Recovery of the Defense Industry

first_img Minister Puricelli emphasized that “our American continent, as it did two hundred years ago, has realized the necessity of its unity and integrity. Our continent is opening its eyes to the global significance of this South America, blessed by God with natural resources, with water, with protein, with energy, and with biodiversity,” and he added, “This has been clearly noted by the leaders who guide the region today, and also by our most recent presidents, one of whom was from my same province, filling me with pride that he attained the objectives he did. By Dialogo June 01, 2011 In addition, the minister recalled the progress achieved on the way toward recovering defense scientific and technological capacity: “We’ve recovered the Naval Industrial Complex and the Argentine Airplane Factory, which fills us with pride, because fifty years ago, it produced the planet’s third jet airplane.” Argentine Defense Minister Arturo Puricelli alluded to the administration’s commitment “to the recovery of the defense industry and defense technology” during the celebration of the 201st anniversary of the Argentine Army, at a ceremony held at the Military College of the Nation, in the locality of El Palomar. center_img Puricelli noted the policies that the ministry is pursuing in order to expand and improve its equipment. “We are completing a cycle of capability planning within the framework of the Armed Forces Joint General Staff in order to define a suitable military force for the future,” he said, and he added, “That military force is going to determine that we should apply very significant resources to modernize the equipment that we have, but also to acquire new equipment that is equal to the capabilities of our military men.” This man was sent to say what he said, because the terrible defense situation has had enough. The ship named National Defense cannot have more holes. They have noticed it is something worth to invest on.last_img read more

Three lending regulatory issues to watch in 2015

first_imgPay particular attention to TILA-RESPA, HMDA, and fair lending changes.by: Andrea StritzkeThe regulatory environment continues to be active in 2015, and it is important for the credit union industry to advocate for regulatory relief.Credit union industry leaders and trade associations continue to actively advocate for credit unions—and it seems Congress is listening.Here are three areas to watch and advocate for favorable regulatory actions:1. TILA-RESPAThe Truth in Lending Act/Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (TILA-RESPA) Integrated Disclosure rule (TRID) takes effect Aug. 1, 2015.The TRID rule combines TILA-RESPA disclosures for closed-end credit transactions secured by real property (subject to a few exceptions) into a loan estimate and closing disclosure. The credit union industry, bankers, and realtors are lobbying the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to provide a grace period for enforcement.NCUA has informally indicated that it will consider credit unions’ good faith efforts to comply with the rule by Aug. 1. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Meet the 14 men tasked to deliver Afcon 2017 hosting rights to Ghana today

first_imgGhana’s bid to host the 2017 African Cup is in its final throes with a high-level delegation currently in Cairo to boost the effort.The team touched down in the Egyptian capital this morning as the Confederation of African Football deliberates on various issues affecting the continent’s game.The committee is led by its chairman Ernest Thompson, three time African Footballer of the Year Abedi Ayew Pele and GFA Veep Fred Crentsil.Also there are ex-GFA spokesman Randy Abbey, businessman Herbert Mensah and former Hearts boss Dr. Nyaho Nyaho Tamakloe.The rest are Lepowura Mohammed ND Jawula and Nana Sam Brew, both past GFA bosses as well as the Chief Ops Officer for CAN 2008 LOC Rex Danquah, GNPC boss Alex Mould and Abdullai Yakubu.Some eminent footballers on the team are also there in the form of ex-Ghana captains Anthony Yeboah and Stephen Appiah and boxing legend Azumah Nelson. The committee is expected to complete final lobbying efforts of the 54 Caf reps at the meeting.Joy Sports sources say Ghana’s biggest challenger will be Gabon who, together with Algeria, are the nations gunning for the hosting rights as well.The host nation will be named on Wednesday, April 8.–Follow Gary on Twitter: @garyalsmithlast_img read more

Byron Scott ‘felt betrayed, lied to and deceived’ by Mitch Kupchak, Jim Buss

first_imgByron Scott and Luke Walton had an unexpected meeting a few months ago, crossing paths at a restaurant after one of the Lakers’ late-season games. After exchanging pleasantries, their conversation shifted to Walton’s first season as the Lakers’ head coach.• HEAR THE PODCAST: Byron Scott on rookies, rebuilding, and the Lakers’ road back to greatness“I told him he’s doing a good job and to keep it up,” Scott said of Walton, whose team finished 26-56 as the organization made its fourth consecutive trip to the NBA draft lottery. “He told me a little bit about his frustrations, which I understood. But I thought he did a good job under the circumstances. If they give him a couple of those pieces that I’m sure they will, he’ll be much better next year.”The Lakers’ brass has offered Walton unequivocal support. Everyone from controlling owner Jeanie Buss to president of basketball operations Magic Johnson and General Manager Rob Pelinka praises his performance and the culture he is creating. Hence, Scott stressed “this is not one of those books that is a feel-great book.” The book, co-authored by business executive and close friend Charlie Norris, blends success stories and failures from Scott’s 14-year playing career and head-coaching stints in New Jersey (2000-2004), New Orleans (2004-2009), Cleveland (2010-13) and the Lakers (2014-16). The book also offered insight on Norris’ various businesses.“We took risks and weren’t afraid to step out and try new things. When we failed at those things, we were able to forget about them,” Scott said. “You think about them and reflect on them. But you also have to have the mindset of moving on. You also have to learn from them.”Scott maintains he has moved on from his Lakers head-coaching stint. He spent the past year working on his book and appearing as an NBA analyst on ESPN’s “The Jump.” During that self-reflection, however, Scott said he has no regrets about how he handled his time as Lakers coach.“Given that opportunity again,” Scott said, “I wouldn’t change anything, especially my approach.”In other words, Scott does not want a mulligan for yanking starting spots away from lottery picks D’Angelo Russell and forward Julius Randle only 20 games into the 2015-16 season. The duo later reclaimed their positions shortly after the NBA All-Star break.“I would do the same thing. I still felt like the job was given to them,” Scott said. “I don’t have a problem with young guys growing, understanding and developing in that (starting) role, but I do have a problem when they don’t cherish it, when they don’t hold it to a higher standard, when they don’t come ready to work.”Scott also dismissed criticism from inside and outside the Lakers of his stern approach, which affected his relationships with Russell and Nick Young. Scott mused “this old-school stuff people keep talking about, if old school and hard work is winning, I guess I’m old school.” He also contended, “I relate with players extremely well.”“There’s not a player in this league I had that I can’t communicate with or had some good relationships with,” Scott said. “Are there players that played for me that can’t stand me and vice versa? Yeah. I’m sure there are. But most of the players that I coached, when I come into contact with them, it’s nothing but mutual respect.”Reaching the young playersDespite his strong convictions, Scott said he once asked Norris for advice on getting through to Russell, Randle and Jordan Clarkson. Norris suggested Scott ask them two questions.The first: “What is blocking them from being great?”The second: “How can I help you become great?”Scott liked how Randle answered those questions. Scott said Randle blamed himself and pleaded with him “to stay on me, push me and make me accountable for everything I do.” Though Walton never took away Randle’s starting spot last season, he also found himself prodding the forward.“I’m still a big fan of Julius Randle,” Scott said. “He is a terrific young man and is really mature for his age. I think he wants to be great.”Scott has different feelings about Russell. He said the then-rookie’s demotion was partly because he frequently arrived to the Lakers’ facility only minutes before practice started. So, Scott eventually required his young players to complete individual workouts 30 minutes before and after practice.Though Walton has given Russell positive reinforcement regarding his play and has seen him participate in offseason workouts, he often mentioned Russell’s ongoing process in establishing a routine. Despite Russell averaging 15.6 points, 4.8 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.4 steals during his second season, Johnson and Pelinka instructed him to focus on improving his consistency, conditioning and leadership.“I don’t know if his work ethic has gotten any better. Some of the people I’ve talked to in the organization said that it hasn’t,” Scott said of Russell. “I just wish him all the best. The maturity level will catch up to him sooner or later when he realizes it’s an honor and a privilege to be in the NBA and be in the position that he’s in. He has to take full advantage of it.”Scott believes Clarkson took full advantage of his time, morphing from a seldom-used rookie into a definitive starter in 2014-15. A fan of Clarkson’s work ethic, Scott did say he found him “pressing in trying to score more and do more” during his second season because of his pending free agency. The Lakers ultimately re-signed Clarkson to a four-year, $50 million deal last summer.“I wanted him to be himself. But I didn’t want him to go out there and try to make things happen,” Scott said of Clarkson. “When you do that and think a little selfishly, it can come back and bite you in the butt because you can play even worse. He understood where I was coming from. I want all these guys to do well on the court because obviously financially it helps them and their family. He’s one of the guys I have a lot of respect for.”Therefore, Scott downplayed any potential awkward feelings Randle, Clarkson and Tarik Black might have felt when Scott was seated with them earlier this offseason at a Los Angeles Urban League event where Johnson was being honored.“It wasn’t like it was uncomfortable whatsoever,” Scott said. “We all had a really good time. Nothing but mutual respect for those guys.”As for the futureAs former Lakers teammates, Scott and Johnson share a mutual respect. Johnson wrote the foreword to Scott’s book, and Scott predicts the Lakers will be “back to championship-caliber basketball” in three to four years partly because of Johnson’s new role.“Earvin is a guy who isn’t going to take a bunch of crap,” Scott said. “He is a guy who is going to tell it to guys like it is. If he wants you gone, he’s going to get rid of you. If he doesn’t think you’re worthy of wearing that purple and gold and made of the right stuff, which is about winning, then he will find somebody else who is.”Scott isn’t sure if he’ll ever coach again, but after a year of self-reflection, he believes he would fare better coaching in college instead of the NBA.“They give you more time and you have a little bit more security,” Scott said. “There are too many teams in the NBA where owners and general managers say one thing and then the next year do another. I just don’t like the disloyalty and the politics that are going on a lot in the NBA. If I coach again, the collegiate level would be the better fit for me.”Why?“I get a chance to meet some of these guys when they’re 17 and 18 years old and hopefully make an impact on them before they make it to the NBA,” Scott said. “We still have too many guys who played AAU ball who still don’t have a clue on how to play the game of basketball. They still don’t know how to run a three-man fast break. There’s so many little things. I think I can have a much better impact on that level than I can on the NBA level.” AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersScott remembers a far different environment when he was the head coach with a different front office. His teams went a combined 38-126 during the 2014-15 and 2015-16 seasons as he tried to juggle managing the final injury-plagued seasons of Kobe Bryant’s career while trying to develop a young roster. He was fired, replaced quickly by Walton, then a Golden State assistant coach.Scott said he “felt betrayed, lied to and deceived” by former Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak and former executive Jim Buss. Though he had only two guaranteed years on his four-year contract, Scott contends that Kupchak and Jim Buss previously promised him they would exercise the team option for his third year. Scott also believes the Lakers used him to manage Bryant during his final seasons and farewell tour before making the coach a scapegoat for the franchise’s struggles.“If I asked him to do certain things, Kobe would do it because of his respect for me,” said Scott, who mentored Bryant during his rookie season in 1996-97. “Basically, you just wanted me there to help you guys get through the next two years, so Kobe doesn’t go crazy on you guys. I would be the one that can handle it. They know me. I’m not going to back down. I’m not going to be intimidated by anybody.”Success and failuresScott considers his experience as Lakers coach a “hard lesson learned,” which he addressed in a new book titled, “Slam-Dunk Success: Leading from Every Position on Life’s Court.” The title is a nod to both his time with the 1980s “Showtime” Lakers, when he helped them win three NBA titles and his time as the coach who oversaw the franchise’s two worst seasons.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more