Polygamy: The Next Frontier

first_imgThe American Conservative 18 February 2017Family First Comment: “Remember when all the “Haters” warned a decade or more ago that legalising gay marriage required uncoupling marriage from procreation and basing it on expressive individualism, and that this would open the door to polygamy? Remember how they were all denounced as alarmist bigots?”Here’s the jacket copy for a forthcoming book from the University Press of New England: Legalizing Plural Marriage: The Next Frontier of Family Law, by Emory law professor Mark Goldfeder. A law school librarian sent the link in, saying it was coming to her library:Polygamous marriages are currently recognized in nearly fifty countries worldwide. Although polygamy is technically illegal in the United States, it is practiced by members of some religious communities and a growing number of other “poly” groups. In the radically changing and increasingly multicultural world in which we live, the time has come to define polygamous marriage and address its legal feasibilities.Although Mark Goldfeder does not argue the right or wrong of plural marriage, he maintains that polygamy is the next step—after same-sex marriage—in the development of U.S. family law. Providing a road map to show how such legalization could be handled, he explores the legislative and administrative arguments which demonstrate that plural marriage is not as farfetched—or as far off—as we might think. Goldfeder argues not only that polygamy is in keeping with the legislative values and freedoms of the United States, but also that it would not be difficult to manage or administrate within our current legal system. His legal analysis is enriched throughout with examples of plural marriage in diverse cultural and historical contexts.Tackling the issue of polygamy in the United States from a legal perspective, this book will engage anyone interested in constitutional law, family law, or criminal law, along with sociologists and those who study gender and culture in modern times.Remember when all the Haters™ warned a decade or more ago that legalizing gay marriage required uncoupling marriage from procreation and basing it on expressive individualism, and that this would open the door to polygamy? Remember how they were all denounced as alarmist bigots?Let us recall the Law of Merited Impossibility: It will never happen, and when it does, you bigots will deserve it. I think that the late Antonin Scalia is the patron saint of the Law of Merited Impossibility. In his 2003 Lawrence v. Texas dissent, he pointed out that the Court had opened the legal door to constitutionalizing same-sex marriage. He was right about that, as we saw in the majority ruling in Obergefell. In his Lawrence dissent, Scalia also said this:The Court embraces instead Justice Stevens’ declaration in his Bowers dissent, that “the fact that the governing majority in a State has traditionally viewed a particular practice as immoral is not a sufficient reason for upholding a law prohibiting the practice,” ante, at 17. This effectively decrees the end of all morals legislation. If, as the Court asserts, the promotion of majoritarian sexual morality is not even a legitimate state interest, none of the above-mentioned laws can survive rational-basis review.Polygamy is coming. American society is deconstructing itself.https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/polygamy-the-next-frontier/last_img read more

Pakistan’s Hassan Ali named player of ICC Champions Trophy

first_img… Hassan also wins Golden Ball trophy; Shikhar Dhawan wins Golden Bat trophyFAST bowler Hassan Ali was named player of the ICC Champions Trophy 2017 after he bowled Pakistan to its maiden ICC Champions Trophy title at The Oval.Sunday’s 181 runs victory over traditional rival India was also Pakistan’s first title in a 50-over tournament since winning the ICC Cricket World Cup 1992.Pakistan had won the ICC World Twenty20 England 2009, and as such, has become only the fourth side after India, Sri Lanka and the West Indies to win all the three ICC majors.Hassan also won the Golden Ball trophy after finishing the series with 13 wickets, while India opener Shikhar Dhawan, who had won the player of the tournament in 2013, walked away with the Golden Bat trophy with 338 runs.Hassan Ali was in sublime form in the tournament when he displayed excellent variation, picked up wickets consistently and in crucial phases during Pakistan’s successful journey in the competition, which had started with a 124 runs drubbing at hands of India at Edgbaston on 4 June.After being at the wrong end of the stick against India when he picked up one for 70 in 10 overs, Hassan bounced back strongly and returned figures of three for 24 against South Africa, three for 43 against Sri Lanka, three for 35 against England in the Cardiff semi-final and three for 19 in the final against India.As such, he finished the series with 13 wickets at an average of 14.69 and an economy-rate of 4.29.Hassan was selected as the Player of the Tournament by a five-person selection panel that comprised Geoff Allardice (ICC General Manager – Cricket, and Chairman Event Technical Committee), former captains Michael Atherton of England, India’s Sourav Ganguly, Ramiz Raja of Pakistan, as well as Lawrence Booth (Editor, Wisden Almanack, and cricket writer, The Mail) and Julian Guyer (correspondent of the Agence France-Presse).Meanwhile, Dhawan won the Golden Bat trophy after finishing as the leading run-getter.The left-hander scored 68 against Pakistan, 125 against Sri Lanka, 78 against South Africa, 46 in the semi-final against Bangladesh and 21 against Pakistan in the final.ICC Champions Trophy Player of the Tournament winners:1998 – Jacques Kallis (South Africa)2000 – Not awarded2002 – Not awarded2004 – Ramnaresh Sarwan (West Indies)2006 – Chris Gayle (West Indies)2009 – Ricky Ponting (Australia)2013 – Shikhar Dhawan (India)2017 – Hassan Ali (Pakistan)last_img read more