For worldchampion jumping rope and physics go handinhand

For an Ohio State first-year in physics, Tori Boggs knows a lot about jumping rope.Boggs is a nine-time world rope skipping champion and a two-time world record holder, the current captain of both Jump Company USA and the U.S. National Jump Rope team, and a member of the USA All-Star Ambassador Jump Rope team.“It’s one of those things where you absolutely have to see jump rope to believe it and you just get hooked at the first sight,” Boggs said.Jumping rope is nothing new to Boggs, a Parkersburg, W.Va., native. The 20-year-old has been involved in the sport since she was 5 when she walked into a jump roping event at the Junior Olympic tournament where her brother was participating in a Tae Kwon Do competition.“She went into a gym where they were jumping rope and saw it and didn’t want to leave,” said her mother and jump rope coach, Rochelle Boggs. The mother-daughter pair stumbled upon an advertisement in their local newspaper the following week for tryouts and have never looked back.“She’s my coach now, so we’ve grown in the sport together,” Tori Boggs said.But Tori Boggs is the only person to her knowledge on OSU’s campus who participates in competitive rope skipping, something that means she spends many weekends traveling to perform and compete with her various teams. OSU does not provide any resources for her jump roping, but she said she is “working on” getting jump roping to the point where it is associated with the university.Last year, Tori Boggs spent the summer as part of a circus. She said she might want to pursue performing as a career.“I did a holiday tour with “Cirque Dreams” so it was a national tour, so I toured for a few months and we went around and I jumped rope in the circus,” she said. “I’m (also) employed by Cirque de Soleil for special events.“Ultimately I want to be on a Cirque de Soleil tour.”Until that point, Tori Boggs said she has dreams of bettering the sport of rope skipping.“I’m going to switch to engineering so I can actually apply physics, but basically my motivation for (pursuing a degree) is that I love jump rope so much, my body knows exactly what I’m doing, my muscles know what they’re doing, but I don’t know how to explain it,” Boggs said. “So I want to look at the forces that jump rope places on our body. I want to be able to design a better handle for jumpers, I want to be able to design better shoes and understanding the surfaces that we jump on, like how does that affect our body?”She said currently she is involved with the biomechanics lab at the Wexner Medical Center where she does tricks and uses technology to show her where the forces on her joints are located.“I want to be able to develop better products and improve training methods, and then I’m pre-med, too, so maybe I can go to med school and use that. I don’t know, there’s a lot of options,” Tori Boggs said.With the inaugural 2013 Arnold Classic jump rope competition happening this weekend, she has been working overtime to recruit novice jumpers to register.“I’ve seen people just playing around with the ropes so I always give them Arnold papers and talk to them about jump rope,” she said.The competition is being co-chaired by Rochelle Boggs, and it will have three different competitive categories, encompassing all age groups and skill levels from those who have never jumped before to professionals like Tori Boggs. Other professional jump ropers are excited about the opportunities the weekend may bring.“Any sort of way that we can get the public to view the sport is really exciting,” said Jen Evans, a grand national champion and three-time world medalist who will be attending OSU next year to work on a doctorate of physical therapy. Evans is a Strongville, Ohio, native and currently attends Baldwin Wallace University in Berea, Ohio.“It’s really cool because I know that people from Columbus will be there and I’m hoping that it increases the awareness of jump rope,” Evans said. Rochelle Boggs said the new competition will fit in at the Arnold well.“The cool thing is it’s kind of like a natural progression to see jump rope get to the Arnold because Arnold is all about fitness and movement,” she said.The Arnold Jump Rope Fitness Competition will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. read more

Womens Basketball Ohio State dominates No 23 Rutgers on road 5939

Ohio State redshirt senior guard Carly Santoro (10) goes up for a shot in the game against Penn State on Feb 6. Ohio State won 78-73. Credit: Cori Wade | Lantern PhotographerThe Ohio State women’s basketball team (11-12, 7-7 Big Ten) came away with a commanding victory on the road against No. 23 Rutgers (17-7, 9-4 Big Ten) by a score of 59-39 on Thursday.The 39 points are the least Ohio State has allowed to a ranked team in program history.After losing by more than 20 points at home to No. 14 Iowa, the Buckeyes came out with a vengeance and controlled the game from the get go. A 21-1 run in the latter half of the first quarter and the beginning of the second quarter gave Ohio State a 20-point lead that was never seriously threatened for the rest of the game. Redshirt senior forward Adreana Miller came off the bench led the way for the Buckeyes during the run, scoring nine of the 21 points. Miller ended up with 14 points on the night, was 3-of-5 from the 3-point line and tallied three rebounds. All of Ohio State’s scoring came from six players.Other contributors on the offensive side came in the form of redshirt senior guard Carly Santoro and freshman forward Dorkha Juhasz. Santoro scored 12 points with five rebounds and Juhasz was just one-point shy of a double double with nine points and 13 rebounds. Freshman guard Janai Crooms also added 10 points of her own with five assists and five rebounds, and redshirt senior guard Carmen Grande scored eight points, led the team in assists with eight and also had five rebounds. In total, Ohio State shot 46 percent from the field while the Buckeyes’ defense limited the Scarlet Knights as Rutgers was a lowly 16-61 on the night. Ohio State outrebounded the Scarlet Knights 44-35, and did that without the help of redshirt senior forward Makayla Waterman, the No. 2 rebounder on the team, who did not play in the game. Ohio State will attempt to build off this victory at home when it takes on Wisconsin at 2 p.m. on Sunday. read more

Google parent hit by higher costs names new chairman

Shares in Alphabet slid 2.3 percent in after-hours trade on the results, highlighting concerns about rising costs for the online giant and profits weaker than expected.Alphabet reported a loss of $3 billion for the fourth quarter as it set aside $11 billion for taxes. An estimated $9.9 billion was for taxes on repatriated earnings.The California tech giant said revenues in the last three months of 2017 rose 24 percent from a year ago to $32.3 billion and cited “great growth” for the company.The company used the earnings report to announce it had named board member and former Stanford University president John Hennessy as chairman, replacing Schmidt, who announced his departure in December.Hennessy has been a board member since 2004 and lead independent director since April 2007.In the earnings report, Google remained the key driver of revenue and profit for the company, which has reorganized into new divisions for self-driving vehicles, life sciences and other so-called “moonshot” projects.The Google segment accounted for $31.9 billion in revenue and delivered an operating profit of $8.8 billion.”Overall, we are interpreting the quarter’s results favorably if only because they were ahead of our conservative expectations,” Pivotal Research group senior research analyst Brian Wieser said in a note to investors.”Alphabet reported good 4Q17 results which were generally consistent with our long-term views on the company.”Excluding the tax provision—following the lead of other multinationals taking advantage of a favorable rate to repatriate earnings—Alphabet would have posted a profit of $6.8 billion.”Our momentum reflects a relentless focus on users, advertisers and enterprise customers, as well as the benefits of our commitment to long-term investing,” chief financial officer Ruth Porat said.’Other bets’Porat said Alphabet was pleased with the progress of its “other bets,” which include the life sciences unit Verily and a new cybersecurity division called Chronicle. Credit: CC0 Public Domain Google parent company Alphabet on Thursday reported a quarterly loss to set aside funds to pay taxes on repatriated profits, and named a new chairman to replace outgoing Eric Schmidt. Google parent Alphabet reports $3 bn loss on tax provision Explore further Citation: Google parent hit by higher costs, names new chairman (2018, February 2) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-02-google-parent-higher-chairman.html © 2018 AFP The units, born of an X lab devoted to “moonshots,” delivered revenue of $409 million, up from $262 million a year earlier. The loss from those projects narrowed to $916 million from $1.1 billion.Google CEO Sundar Pichai said he expects more diversification at the company, which has relied on the internet search engine and its related advertising revenues.”As we’ve consistently emphasized, alongside the continued momentum in our advertising business, we are focused on building a second wave of growth within Google over the medium and long-term, which includes the rapidly growing revenue businesses in Google, cloud, hardware and YouTube,” Pichai told a conference call.Google on Thursday expanded its YouTube Go application tailored for emerging markets to more than 130 countries, promising to deliver local, relevant video despite spotty or unreliable mobile data networks. More than 1.5 billion people watch videos at YouTube each month, and a subscription YouTube TV service was recently made available on Roku devices.Smart home devices by Nest, another subsidiary, boasted a strong holiday season, and ended the year in 12 new countries more than doubling its markets from the year 2016, according to Google.Google executives also said that progress at its self-driving car unit Waymo was “accelerating,” and that it was the first company to have a fleet of cars navigating public roads without humans in the driver seats.They declined to discuss how they planned to make money at Waymo, saying it was still early days for the unit o Google.A billion-dollar trade secrets trial pitting Alphabet-owned Waymo against Uber starts Monday, with jurors finally getting to hear evidence rival attorneys have spent months dueling over.The case stems from a lawsuit filed last year by Waymo—previously known as the Google self-driving car unit—which claimed former manager Anthony Levandowski took a trove of technical data with him when he left to launch a competing venture that went on to become Otto and was later acquired by Uber. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more